Woo-Woo medicine gets credibility in local paper
Posted: 18 November 2008 05:19 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Homeopathic practice finds niche among Hispanics

According to the article, this homeopathic doctor was having trouble making ends meet, so she’s gotten and interpreter and started placing ads in Spanish language papers. Business has picked up.

“Robinson’s practice, Natural Solutions for Health, uses nutritional counseling, diet and exercise planning, thermal massage and dietary supplements to heal the body without prescription drugs or invasive surgeries.”

Interesting how the local paper makes no mention of herbal treatments being unreliable and not scientifically proven. And something that bothers me - she’s been treating a young man with symptoms of depression, with fish oil. Sounds ‘fishy’ to me. (Shouldn’t he be in counseling if he is depressed?)

Thoughts on the article, and her choices for treatment, anyone?

Also, feel free to post a note in the comments section at the bottom of the article, if you are so inclined. Right now it’s about half for the woo-woos, and half against the woo-woos.
wink

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Posted: 18 November 2008 08:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Sad. It’s an example of preying on the underprivileged again. I sometimes listen to spanish radio stations, and the amount of quackery they take for advertising is depressing. All that money wasted.

shut eye

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Posted: 18 November 2008 09:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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It is a city with a large population of undocumented immigrants, and I feel they are being taken advantage of, rather than genuinely helped. The low-cost clinic is overwhelmed, for sure, and many of the workers don’t feel they have many places to turn.

So when people like this ‘doctor’ advertise low rates and friendly help without a lot of red tape, people are going to take it. I’m sure she charges a lot less than a physician would for someone with no insurance so they may see her as the only hope. I don’t think she’s doing it maliciously, she’s probably convinced herself she is doing a good service when in reality they are being taken advantage of. She may honestly believe she is helping. But as mentioned in the article, she’s having trouble finding services for her patients, such as MRIs.

I also wonder if she is even a real doctor, of if she has one of those “mail order” natural medicine degrees I see in the back of the vegetarian cooking magazine, from some unaccredited woo-woo school. What was that one, Clayton Natural Medicine College?

The whole article leaves me concerned.

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Some people can read War and Peace and come away thinking it’s a simple adventure story. Others can read the ingredients on a chewing gum wrapper and unlock the secrets of the universe.    - Lex Luthor

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