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TIME Magazine: How Faith Can Heal
Posted: 17 February 2009 11:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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VYAZMA - 17 February 2009 11:13 AM

First,would anyone consider Tai Chi spiritualism?Or meditation?If these could be construed to be spiritualism,which in my opinion they are,then the connection MUST be made considering RomanCatholicism,Judaism,Mormons,Muslims and all the rest.
Tai-Chi or meditation are certainly lauded as healing,restoring methods of obtaining a good mind-body balance.Is there direct evidence which shows that a person who is relatively well-balanced,and less stressed more apt to have good health?

Most items regarded as “spiritualism” in which self awareness is practiced can benefit the individual perhaps even more directly than those practicing “god awareness”.  Some even seek to become “god” as their ultimate goal.

As some major religions center on the workings of the mind and the suppression of the ego in particular as being the desirable state of being, these would seem to promote a concept of “oneself as god” providing that the various distractions of actual physical existence can be shelved long enough to reach Nirvana or such other entropical paradise. Having reached such a state, one would have to suppose that physical problems associated with the “leftover meat” would no longer concern the successful adherent and thus the need for any “cure” is rendered moot, but alternatively one could also say that the cure or at least a relief from all suffering has been effected – at least for a while.

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Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by rulers as useful. - Seneca (ca. 4 BC –AD 65)

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Posted: 17 February 2009 11:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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gray1 - 17 February 2009 11:52 AM
VYAZMA - 17 February 2009 11:13 AM

First,would anyone consider Tai Chi spiritualism?Or meditation?If these could be construed to be spiritualism,which in my opinion they are,then the connection MUST be made considering RomanCatholicism,Judaism,Mormons,Muslims and all the rest.
Tai-Chi or meditation are certainly lauded as healing,restoring methods of obtaining a good mind-body balance.Is there direct evidence which shows that a person who is relatively well-balanced,and less stressed more apt to have good health?

Most items regarded as “spiritualism” in which self awareness is practiced can benefit the individual perhaps even more directly than those practicing “god awareness”.  Some even seek to become “god” as their ultimate goal.

As some major religions center on the workings of the mind and the suppression of the ego in particular as being the desirable state of being, these would seem to promote a concept of “oneself as god” providing that the various distractions of actual physical existence can be shelved long enough to reach Nirvana or such other entropical paradise. Having reached such a state, one would have to suppose that physical problems associated with the “leftover meat” would no longer concern the successful adherent and thus the need for any “cure” is rendered moot, but alternatively one could also say that the cure or at least a relief from all suffering has been effected – at least for a while.

Yes,yes Gray1.I knew also that problems would arise in my offering these eastern slanted methods as examples.I don’t wan’t to quantify the “Id” and the “ego” part of all this spiritualism.I only wish to address the “possible healing,restorative,and preventative issues inherent in meditation and spiritualism”.For example,lowering heart rate,and creating a less stressfull environment.This could be akin to the evidence purported that laughter has healthful benefits,or a 15 min.break from toiling or otherwise stressful activities.15 mins.of quiet,relaxation.

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Posted: 17 February 2009 12:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Of course we could also debate the redundancy of the differentiation of “self-awareness” and “god awareness”.

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Posted: 17 February 2009 12:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Chris Crawford - 16 February 2009 09:30 PM

Maybe “religiosity” is just a mild form of schizophrenia.

Doesn’t that mean that atheism is a mild form of autism?  cheese

Sure. Just like fatherhood is a mild form of hypergonadism.  smirk

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Posted: 17 February 2009 12:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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one major shortcoming w/in the clinical literature is that there is no standardized definition of “spirituality” - what is considered “spiritual” in one study may not be in another - or the definition of “spiritual” gets so vague and inclusive that it becomes basically synonymous with mental health.

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Posted: 17 February 2009 01:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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skuld - 17 February 2009 12:52 PM

one major shortcoming w/in the clinical literature is that there is no standardized definition of “spirituality” - what is considered “spiritual” in one study may not be in another - or the definition of “spiritual” gets so vague and inclusive that it becomes basically synonymous with mental health.

I can imagine that Skuld.However we can infer that “spiritualism” in all it’s manifestations,has rites,prayers,meditations,value systems,or whatever which can induce a feeling of well being mentally.As was mentioned in your Freud Quote,the more fervant a practitioner,than a perhaps more benefits can be reaped.
Yes and also,my angle on this has to do with mental health.And the possible connections between mental health and physical health.
This last sentence was typed in response to your spiritualism having an amorphous definition which may be sometimes lumped into mental health.

[ Edited: 17 February 2009 01:23 PM by VYAZMA ]
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Posted: 17 February 2009 01:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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skuld - 17 February 2009 12:52 PM

one major shortcoming w/in the clinical literature is that there is no standardized definition of “spirituality” - what is considered “spiritual” in one study may not be in another - or the definition of “spiritual” gets so vague and inclusive that it becomes basically synonymous with mental health.

Is this a problem with the clinical literature per se? Or rather a problem with the concept of “spiritualism” to begin with?

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Posted: 17 February 2009 01:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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both, i suppose.

[eta:  one can’t produce solid research without well defined constructs.]

[ Edited: 18 February 2009 02:12 PM by skuld ]
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Posted: 17 February 2009 02:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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It’s very difficult to get away from religious connotations when when using the word “spiritual”.  Perhaps the term “self-awareness” best skirts the issue if meditation, etc. for health purposes alone without religion is needed, and the term “mindful meditation” is increasingly popular as discussed in this Dr. Ginger Campbell’s “Brain Science Podcast” episode:
http://docartemis.com/brainsciencepodcast/2008/08/22/44-siegel/

That said, the long established Eastern practices which utilize meditation are still categorized as religions whether they recognize many gods or no “god” at all.  Religion even without a god-being overseer generally holds to a system of accounting for one’s actions such as “karma” while most religions manage (at least in theory) to be cognizant of the necessity for altrusim and morality.  In an ideal world, this sounds pretty healthy for a society as well as an individual.

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Posted: 17 February 2009 02:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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gray1 - 17 February 2009 02:36 PM

It’s very difficult to get away from religious connotations when when using the word “spiritual”.  Perhaps the term “self-awareness” best skirts the issue if meditation, etc. for health purposes alone without religion is needed, and the term “mindful meditation” is increasingly popular as discussed in this Dr. Ginger Campbell’s “Brain Science Podcast” episode:
http://docartemis.com/brainsciencepodcast/2008/08/22/44-siegel/

That said, the long established Eastern practices which utilize meditation are still categorized as religions whether they recognize many gods or no “god” at all.  Religion even without a god-being overseer generally holds to a system of accounting for one’s actions such as “karma” while most religions manage (at least in theory) to be cognizant of the necessity for altrusim and morality.  In an ideal world, this sounds pretty healthy for a society as well as an individual.

Yes Gray,and I will put forward that I would be able to substitute religion for the word “spiritualism"in any of my posts.I picked the word spiritualism because it came up briefly beforehand,and it was a good word in context for my basis of meditation,and “sound mind and body pretexts”.

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Posted: 18 February 2009 01:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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gray1 - 17 February 2009 02:36 PM

It’s very difficult to get away from religious connotations when when using the word “spiritual”.  Perhaps the term “self-awareness” best skirts the issue if meditation, etc. for health purposes alone without religion is needed, and the term “mindful meditation” is increasingly popular

which goes to show how hard it is to define what “spritual” means.  perhaps “spirituality” is really a composite of “religion” and “existentiality”?  or am i just throwing around more words?

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Posted: 18 February 2009 02:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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George - 16 February 2009 07:42 PM

I think the reason why more women than men are religious (and are more likely to believe in ghosts, angels, etc.) can be perhaps explained by the fact that more women than men suffer from schizophrenia; men are more likely to be autistic (they now suspect that autism and schizophrenia represent opposite ends of a spectrum). Maybe “religiosity” is just a mild form of schizophrenia. This would also explain why most scientists, usually men (many of scientists are slightly autistic), are non-believers.

actually, religiosity might just be one point on a continuum that extends toward superstition and eventually to OCD.

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Posted: 18 February 2009 02:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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What do you mean by “extends”? You are not saying that religiosity or superstition could cause OCD, right? I don’t understand. red face

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Posted: 18 February 2009 05:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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skuld - 18 February 2009 01:37 PM
gray1 - 17 February 2009 02:36 PM

It’s very difficult to get away from religious connotations when when using the word “spiritual”.  Perhaps the term “self-awareness” best skirts the issue if meditation, etc. for health purposes alone without religion is needed, and the term “mindful meditation” is increasingly popular

which goes to show how hard it is to define what “spritual” means.  perhaps “spirituality” is really a composite of “religion” and “existentiality”?  or am i just throwing around more words?

Right Skuld! Let’s not ramble around the terminology department.That’s why I said “I” was willing to substitute the word “religion” for “spirituality” in my posts.Please continue,won’t you.

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Posted: 18 February 2009 06:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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George - 18 February 2009 02:20 PM

What do you mean by “extends”? You are not saying that religiosity or superstition could cause OCD, right? I don’t understand. red face

whoops… bad edit job.  i meant to say religiosity was on a continuum of behaviors that extend to superstition and OCD.

think i read somewhere too that “highly religious” people showed more O/C symptomatology than moderately religious or nonreligious people.

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