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What are you reading?
Posted: 18 June 2012 10:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 361 ]
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I just started Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain.  It’s pretty good so far but I’m only on page 25.  Has anyone else read it?

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Posted: 18 June 2012 10:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 362 ]
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dougsmith - 07 June 2012 06:11 PM
garythehuman - 07 June 2012 04:19 PM

Sorry no book reports at this time; I am finally able to get up and around a bit and my wife took a header down the stairs Memorial Day; carring the laundry, broke her left elbow; forearm and wrist, two compound and a sigle frature; required immediate surgery.  So now I am a fulltime house husband, besides being behind on my yardwork, with limited time.  shock

Ouch! You guys must be getting sick of doctors!

Best to you both.

Thanks guys,  you are right we are, and yesterday my mother was rushed back to the hospital for another infection, this time in her arm.  I should just get a job there and make the constant running pay. mad

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Posted: 18 June 2012 10:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 363 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 18 June 2012 04:40 AM

If you get a chance Vyasma read Mcpherson’s “Battle Cry of Freedom”. It’s part of the series and I recommend it as the best single volume on the Civil war. It’s a comprehensive coverage of the background to the war and dispels the myth of States Rights as the cause. It answers the revisionist contention as opposed to slavery as the primary cause. He also includes vignettes of the arguments in Congress and the attitudes of both sections including us here in the border states. Also, there are several new volumes out in the series including one by Gordon Wood. I had a chance to talk to McPherson while at Gettysburg. He had just published his book and was on a book signing tour there. Needless to say it’s a well researched monograph and not at all a “drum and trumpet” history.

Cap’t Jack

Yup, that’s already on deck.  I’m just going to read the entire Oxford University Press series-starting from “Glorious Cause”.  The reviews are really outstanding for the series.  “Battle Cry” being acclaimed as well.
Yes, drum and trumpet exactly.  I like straight history.  “Gloriuos” was exactly that.  A great blend of Culture, politics, economics, and military.
Regarding some of your comments from above concerning Jefferson and his intimate relations-that’s my point.  This doesn’t interest me.  I like broad based, policy origin and cultural/political climate effect type history.  Some coloring is important but long passages concerning who Jefferson boffed, or what kind of ties LBJ liked is just fluff to me.
I look forward to the next book, “Empire of Liberty” by Gordon S. Wood.
I also look forward to further feedback and input from you.  If I recall, you are a teacher.  A history teacher, thank you.

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Posted: 18 June 2012 03:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 364 ]
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I also recommend the three volume set by Daniel Boorstin focusing on the colonial through the national experience. Boorstin was the former Librarian of Congress and professor of history. His three volumes are a comprehensive overview of American History from colonial times to the modern era. You can probably get them on ebooks now. It sounds like you’re interested in surveys more than a monograph on one subject and this is a great way to generate interest in the history of any time period. Afterwards you may want to focus in on and incident or bio. There are many definitive works on specific time periods, ex. Fredrick Lewis Allen’s “Only Yesterday” a comprehensive history of the 1920’s, or David Halbrstam’s history of the 50’s to name a very few! The Brodie book doesn’t focus entirely on who Tom boinked (he also had an affair with an Italian opera singer Maria Callas) but how he impacted his time including the writing of the Declaration etc. Even though her book was panned by the critics partially because of the Hemmings affair you do get to see a side of Jefferson rarely mentioned in general histories. Same with Washington He wasn’t as wooden a character as people might imagine. Happy to help. Teaching and learning about history is my passion!


Cap’t Jack

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Posted: 18 June 2012 10:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 365 ]
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I’m currently reading “Warships After Washington” which deals with how naval fleets and ships were developed after the Washington Treaty went into effect.

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Posted: 19 June 2012 03:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 366 ]
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I’m currently reading “Warships After Washington” which deals with how naval fleets and ships were developed after the Washington Treaty went into effect.


Are you referring to the 1922 five powers act to limit the construction of naval battleships and cruisers EOC? sounds interesting. Does it specifically mention ship design?


Cap’t Jack

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Posted: 19 June 2012 07:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 367 ]
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Are you referring to the 1922 five powers act to limit the construction of naval battleships and cruisers EOC? sounds interesting. Does it specifically mention ship design?

That’s the one. It does go into ship design, though not quite in the same depth as specific design histories. It deals with the matter on a more general level to explain why certain decisions were made in light of the restrictions designers had to face.

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Posted: 19 June 2012 08:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 368 ]
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Does it mention the conversion of battleship hulls to be used for aircraft carriers? Both the U.S. and Japan thought of that! If not, the Battle of the Coral Sea probably wouldn’t have happened.

Cap’t Jack

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Posted: 19 June 2012 12:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 369 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 18 June 2012 03:40 PM

I also recommend the three volume set by Daniel Boorstin focusing on the colonial through the national experience. Boorstin was the former Librarian of Congress and professor of history. His three volumes are a comprehensive overview of American History from colonial times to the modern era. You can probably get them on ebooks now. It sounds like you’re interested in surveys more than a monograph on one subject and this is a great way to generate interest in the history of any time period. Afterwards you may want to focus in on and incident or bio. There are many definitive works on specific time periods, ex. Fredrick Lewis Allen’s “Only Yesterday” a comprehensive history of the 1920’s, or David Halbrstam’s history of the 50’s to name a very few! The Brodie book doesn’t focus entirely on who Tom boinked (he also had an affair with an Italian opera singer Maria Callas) but how he impacted his time including the writing of the Declaration etc. Even though her book was panned by the critics partially because of the Hemmings affair you do get to see a side of Jefferson rarely mentioned in general histories. Same with Washington He wasn’t as wooden a character as people might imagine. Happy to help. Teaching and learning about history is my passion!


Cap’t Jack

Thanks! I love history.

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Posted: 19 June 2012 01:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 370 ]
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asanta:

You may also want to try Grant’s Memoirs; I found this to be one of the more interesting books on the US Civil War; gives some insight in the feelings of the time.

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Posted: 19 June 2012 05:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 371 ]
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asanta:

You may also want to try Grant’s Memoirs; I found this to be one of the more interesting books on the US Civil War; gives some insight in the feelings of the time.

It’s a great read, especially since Mark Twain did the editing but typically Grant. Understated. try “I Rode With Grant” by the reporter Sylvanus Cadwalladar (hope I spelled that right). He accompanied Grant in most of his campaigns and had a true reporter’s eye for info. BTW, I’m glad you like history Asanta, would you be interested in reading about African-American military contributions during the War? Ever heard of the 54th Mass.? It was the first all black combat unit.


Cap’t Jack

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Posted: 19 June 2012 08:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 372 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 19 June 2012 05:14 PM

asanta:

You may also want to try Grant’s Memoirs; I found this to be one of the more interesting books on the US Civil War; gives some insight in the feelings of the time.

It’s a great read, especially since Mark Twain did the editing but typically Grant. Understated. try “I Rode With Grant” by the reporter Sylvanus Cadwalladar (hope I spelled that right). He accompanied Grant in most of his campaigns and had a true reporter’s eye for info. BTW, I’m glad you like history Asanta, would you be interested in reading about African-American military contributions during the War? Ever heard of the 54th Mass.? It was the first all black combat unit.


Cap’t Jack

I have heard of the 54th Mass! Right now I’m catching up on the black Civil War troops…. One of my great great grand uncles, fought with a precursor to the famed Buffalo Soldier units; The 6th Regiment, US Colored Calvary, Company D. My great-great grandfather and his 9 brothers fought for the Confederacy. His mother famously said “I have 10 sons to give to the Confederacy, I would give 10 more if I could” (she had 17 children).
My grandfather fought in WWI with Troop B, 10th Calvary—a ‘Buffalo Soldier’ unit. I believe he went into Mexico with Pershing after Pancho Villa in 1914—I am awaiting his records to find out. I found my 4th great grandfather mentioned in a paper among George Washington’s papers, and my 3rd great grandfather funded a battalion during the War of 1812, when the US did not have the money. My dad fought in the Korean War, and 2 uncles were in WWII. I have had family members in every war/conflict since the birth of the nation excepting the Viet-Nam war, and the current Afghanistan/Iraq conflicts.

I would love to have the name of a good book about the 54th Massachusetts. I’d put it on my reading list! smile

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Posted: 20 June 2012 04:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 373 ]
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I have heard of the 54th Mass! Right now I’m catching up on the black Civil War troops…. One of my great great grand uncles, fought with a precursor to the famed Buffalo Soldier units; The 6th Regiment, US Colored Calvary, Company D. My great-great grandfather and his 9 brothers fought for the Confederacy. His mother famously said “I have 10 sons to give to the Confederacy, I would give 10 more if I could” (she had 17 children).
My grandfather fought in WWI with Troop B, 10th Calvary—a ‘Buffalo Soldier’ unit. I believe he went into Mexico with Pershing after Pancho Villa in 1914—I am awaiting his records to find out. I found my 4th great grandfather mentioned in a paper among George Washington’s papers, and my 3rd great grandfather funded a battalion during the War of 1812, when the US did not have the money. My dad fought in the Korean War, and 2 uncles were in WWII. I have had family members in every war/conflict since the birth of the nation excepting the Viet-Nam war, and the current Afghanistan/Iraq conflicts.

Wow, what a family history Asanta! Thanks for sharing it. The title of the book is “One Gallant Rush” from a speech given by Fredrick Douglass. It’s a compilation of narrative and letters by the colonel, Robert Gould Shaw. The book was the inspiration for the movie “Glory”. It stars Morgan Freeman ( one of my favorite actors) and Denzel Washington. Several of us reenactors were used as extras. After his unit proved itself battle worthy 186,000 men of color (the sable arm) fought throughout the war sustaining 33,000 battle deaths. You mentioned your ancestors who fought the Confederacy. Do you know what theater and what regiment? My Dad’s grandfather was in the 45th Va. He was captured in ‘64 and spent the rest of the war in prison camp. Dad is a WW II vet, Marine, and was twice wounded in Okinawa. His uncle was an officer in the Spanish-American war. We also had an ancestor in the Virginia militia during the Rev. War. I tell my students that the long timers here had at least 8 ancestors who experienced the war in some form or the other. It’s interesting that the demarcation line between northern and southern culture is still with us. The tendency is still more liberal in the north and more conservative in the south! I guess you westerners don’t see it as much. Just noticed how long this is, Doug,s going to blue line me!


Cap’t Jack

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Posted: 20 June 2012 07:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 374 ]
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Does it mention the conversion of battleship hulls to be used for aircraft carriers?

Yes, specifically mentioning the Lexington and Saratoga as well as the conversions of the incomplete Japanese battleships.

They were reasonably successful conversions because they were large hulls which gave these ships good endurance, a large capacity for aircraft and plenty of space for ammunition. These qualities counted for a lot in the Pacific.

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Posted: 20 June 2012 02:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 375 ]
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Does it mention the conversion of battleship hulls to be used for aircraft carriers?

Yes, specifically mentioning the Lexington and Saratoga as well as the conversions of the incomplete Japanese battleships.

They were reasonably successful conversions because they were large hulls which gave these ships good endurance, a large capacity for aircraft and plenty of space for ammunition. These qualities counted for a lot in the Pacific.

Yes they did, especially at Midway. You seem to have a deep knowledge of naval history, you former navy?


Cap’t Jack

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