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What are you reading?
Posted: 24 April 2013 09:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 526 ]
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garythehuman - 24 April 2013 08:50 AM
jthorndyke - 24 April 2013 07:42 AM

Just finished Carl Sagan’s “Demon Haunted World”
Am also reading “Doubt”, and “Who Wrote the Bible”, and “The Bible Unearthed”
About to start on Dawkin’s “Greatest Show on Earth” and Harris’ “Free Will”

Such great reading!

I’ve read Who Wrote the Bible a few years ago and just finished The Bible Unearthed.  In the same vein you may want to try The River of God by Gregory J. Riley which I am currently rereading.

Gary,
I shalll certainly give it a read….I’ll see if it’s in my local library…

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Posted: 30 April 2013 08:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 527 ]
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Just finished A Mighty Fortress by David Weber and How Firm a Foundation is next on my chopping block.  I read the first three Safehold books last week.

I also read the first eight books in Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files series in the last month or so.

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“In the end nature is horrific and teaches us nothing.” -Mutual of Omicron

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Posted: 30 April 2013 09:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 528 ]
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Currently reading Brooke Allen’s book, “Moral Minority”. She’s chosen six of the “founding Fathers” and through letters, speeches and anecdotes dispels the myth that they were practicing xtians in the modern sense of the word e.g. The praying Washington painting often seen behind Marco Rubio is fallacious and created to illustrate a story by an early biographer Mason"Parson” Weems. You may remember him as the creator of those just so stories about Washington like the “cherry tree"scenerio and throwing a dollar across the Potomac garbage that used to be fed to school kids. Anyway, good reading and research!

Cap’t Jack

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One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

Thomas Paine

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Posted: 30 April 2013 10:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 529 ]
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Dead Monky - 30 April 2013 08:29 AM

I also read the first eight books in Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files series in the last month or so.

I’ve read the first five or six IIRC. I really like this series. (As much as I’m a bit tired of the ‘magic in modern times’ genre… smile )

He’s got a fantasy series that is pretty cool to: The Codex Alera.

Anyway… Speaking of ‘magic in modern times’  tongue laugh I’m reading Cromm by Kenneth C. Flint, pretty fun so far. About a fellow who’s tied to an ancient Celt in Ireland.

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 18 July 2013 12:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 530 ]
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Just finished On Politics -A History of Political Thought from Herodotus to the Present by Alan Ryan.  It is an excellent review of the development of Western political theories.  However it is extremely long, took me well over a month to get through it.  Read it on a kindle so I don’t know how many pages it actually is.  That being said I would strongly recommend it to anyone interested in politics and if you know any Political Science majors, I believe they will find it most useful. One interesting quote -

“Marx was a frustrated academic with a professor’s incapacity to finish anything properly, a man of many deep insights who was unable to complete any project before being distracted by the next.”  Ryan also observes that Engels was Paul to Marx’s Jesus.  smirk

Next up - the Enlightenment Vision - by Stuart Jordan

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Gary the Human

All the Gods and all religions are created by humans, to meet human needs and accomplish human ends.

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Posted: 10 August 2013 12:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 531 ]
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So the time to end my internet hiatus . . let´s see what happens.

During the past summer i have red, red and red(Stephen King, Jim Thompson, Isaac Bashevis Singer), currently reading Siddartha Mukherjee´s “The Emperor of All Maladies”. It seems quite interesting, and Mukherjee has many perspective on the cancer, and he also makes very is bright comparisons between cancer and AIDS. Also lots of different sources, and tales about fight against smoking industry.

Another quite interesting book which is on my reading list, is Alice Dreger´s “Hermaphrodites and the Medical Invention of Sex”. Hope it can be some new information about fallacy of sex difference and how it was created. I don’t yet know how it shares with the work of Anne Fausto-Sterling.

Do you have any experiences about these books?

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Posted: 16 August 2013 09:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 532 ]
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I finished Aslan’s book “Zealot”, curious to see what all the hubbub was about after the Faux interview fiasco. Very well written and researched IMO. He focused on the controversy surrounding the early church and the conflict between James, representing the original teachings and Paul’s new approach. It was a good read. Even though he’s a muuuuuuuslim!! I’m now reading one of the most frightening books ever published; the real story of our eventual demise, “Death From the Skies’ The Science Behind the End of the World”. This is literally a bend over and kiss your ass goodbye kind of book full of astronomical doomsday scenerios that will shake your complacent attitude about life in this dangerous universe. It’s out to kill us indeed! Phil Plait is scaring the crap outa me! Asteroids and Gamna Rays and suoernovaes, oh my!


Cap’t Jack

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One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

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Posted: 20 August 2013 02:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 533 ]
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I recently finished The Inexplicables by Cherie Priest and The Dragon Men by Steven Harper.

Next up is a collection of Robert E. Howard’s original Conan stories presented as he originally wrote and intended them. None of those stupid rewrites and edits that have so plagued his work over the decades.

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“In the end nature is horrific and teaches us nothing.” -Mutual of Omicron

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Posted: 12 November 2013 02:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 534 ]
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I’ve been listening to The Swerve: How the World became Modern, by Stephen Greenblatt.  It was a free, or very cheap, offer from Audible.  (I have an account and use audiobooks to get through the boring parts of my work.)  I’m not finished, so I can’t do a thorough review, but so far it’s a fascinating account of the rediscovery of a poem by the Roman, Lucretius.  The poem extols the philosophy of Epicurus, ideas which the early Christians did their best to destroy.  Epicurus posited that the world was made up of tiny particles called atoms, that all change was the reorganization of those atoms, that the cause of all events could be found through observing nature, and that there were no gods and man had no immortal soul.  He was pretty much one of us.

Greenblatt’s account of the methods of sophisticated Roman thought and how they valued ideas, the loss of those systems to the monotheistic early Christians and the Christian’s almost inadvertent preservation of those ideas have me fascinated.  I’m just getting into the second part of the book, which discusses the late medieval church and the dawn of the Renaissance.

I’m not much of a scholar, so I can’t make claims about the validity of his viewpoints, but listening to his book makes me eager to learn more.

His account of the loss of the library at Alexandria, and the death of Hypatia, if accurate, are wrenching and reinforce my belief in the malignancy of monotheism.  It’s seems we may have lost a thousand years of opportunity to learn and view our existence rationally because of the idiocy of monotheistic dogma.

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Posted: 13 November 2013 08:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 535 ]
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Currently reading Tom Flynn’s - The Trouble with Christmas.

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Gary the Human

All the Gods and all religions are created by humans, to meet human needs and accomplish human ends.

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Posted: 22 November 2013 01:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 536 ]
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I want to start off with a vote in favour of e-readers.  I have totally run out of physical space for books in my apartment.  I’m glad to be able to put hundreds on an e-reader that takes up very little space.

As to what I am reading, like others here, I always have several on the go at a time. 

I recently finished:

Against the Gods by John Currid

Right now I am reading:

Is God a Moral Monster? by Paul Copan
Turning Points by Mark A. Noll
The Story of Christianity by Justo Gonzalez

Next on my list is:

Miracles by Craig Keener—which is a huge two-volume tome which may keep me busy into the new year!

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Posted: 22 November 2013 01:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 537 ]
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Overcomer;

I agree with you on thee e-reader.  I finally bought a house about five years ago.  Made sure it had two large rooms to use as a library.  Yep, they are pretty much full and I have bought a reader.  Another advantage to it that I like is that I can carry it to various lectures and meetings and have my reference library with me. grin

Is God a Moral Monster? by Paul Copan
Turning Points by Mark A. Noll
The Story of Christianity by Justo Gonzalez

Haven’t read anything by Copan or Gonzalez;  Noll is decent

[ Edited: 22 November 2013 01:51 PM by garythehuman ]
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Posted: 22 November 2013 06:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 538 ]
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Same here. My Kindle is a real space saver. No more stacking books on the floor. Currently reading Price’s “The Incredible Shrinking Son of Man”. Also, a while back, while taking a break from here, I finished Chagnon’s book “Noble Savages”. I’ve followed his exploits since his article in National Geo. many moons ago (late 60’s). He imbedded himself in the primative culture of the Yanomamo in Amazonia and lived among them for nearly thirty years. His research, considered controversial by his colleagues virtually destroyed Rousseau’s concept of the noble savage and added a much needed perspective to our own cultural development, including religion, kinship ties, internecine warfare, hunting practices and treatment of women. It’s an entertaining and enlightening book and reads like an adventure tale. I also read Chip Walter’s “Last Ape Standing”, one of the best books I’ve read on Paleoanthropology in a while.

Cap’t Jack

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One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

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Posted: 22 November 2013 08:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 539 ]
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I’m afraid my book of the month is a dead tree titled Federal Environmental Law: A User’s Guide, by Olga Moya and Andrew Fono. Being a college student sometimes kills my recreational reading time.

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Posted: 23 November 2013 02:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 540 ]
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I like the dead tree products. Alas, as many have mentioned we just don’t have the room for them. Since we’re trying to save money, we’ve been using the library a lot. So books come in but eventually go back out.

Just finished Idiot America by Charles P. Pierce.

I’ve got two books on my list at the moment The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett and Brilliant Blunders: From Darwin to Einstein by Mario Livio. I’ll probably go with the fiction first. I need some escapist reading at the moment. wink

Take care,

Derek

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