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Space Shuttle Discovery scheduled for a July 1, 2006 launch
Posted: 03 July 2006 08:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Happy Independance Day everyone.  I hope at NASA’s
fireworks for the fouth work out well.  grin

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I saw a happy rainbow recently.

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Posted: 03 July 2006 04:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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[quote author=“jump_in_the_pit”]Happy Independance Day everyone.  I hope at NASA’s
fireworks for the fouth work out well.  grin

———

steve,
Thanks. Happy Indepenence Day to you!
Bob

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Posted: 03 July 2006 05:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Space Shuttle Discovery launch update

The MIssion Managemant Team has given a “go” for today’s launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The Team is confident that the crack that was found in the foam will not result in a problem for Discovery during the launch or during it’s flight to the ISS.
There is a 60 percent chance of favorable weather for the launch. If all goes well it will be the first Independence Day launch of a space shuttle.—Source: NASA’s Space Shuttle page of it’s website

Bob

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Posted: 04 July 2006 04:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Space Shuttle Discovery launch update

At 10:42 a.m. the countdown resumed at T-3 hours. There had been a 45 minute hold.  There willl be one final hold at T-9 minutes which will last for 46 minutes.
At 10:24 a.m. the astronauts were getting into their launch and entry spacesuits.  There were no technical or weather problems at that time.
At 8:59 a.m. the astronauts were in the crew dining area for their pre-flight meal.
At 8:30 a.m. NASA announced that the Sun was “shining brightly through blue sky dotted with puffy clouds”.
This will be the third attempt to launch STS-121. If for some reason the launch is scrubbed they will try again tomorrow.—Source: NASA’s Launch Blog

Bob

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Posted: 04 July 2006 09:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Space Shuttle Discovery launch update

“With a rocket’s red glare, Space Shuttle Discovery lifted off from Kennedy Space Center in a spectacular display of sound and light befitting of Independence Day.”
At 2:38 EDT Space Shuttle Discovery lifted off Launch Pad 39B to begin it’s flight to the International Space Station. The mission is to deliver equipment, supplies and another crewmember to the station. While docked at the station the crew of seven astronauts will test new equipment, test new ways to improve shuttle safety and make repairs to the station.—Source: NASA’s Space Shuttle page

Bob

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Posted: 04 July 2006 10:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Best wishes to them. It’s a dangerous job.

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Doug

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El sueño de la razón produce monstruos

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Posted: 04 July 2006 07:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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An editorial about Space Shuttle Discovery’s launch

The following is part of an editorial that appears in today’s New York Times. I think you’ll find it interesting.
“The apparently successful launch of the shuttle Discovery is cause for restrained jubilation. The astronauts are not out of danger yet. Only further inspections will tell whether their fragile vehicle sustained any significant damage on ascent. . . .
The striking thing about this shuttle flight is that the most important task is simply survival—of both the vehicle and the astronauts who are riding in it.
“The space program has been brought to this state by the disastrous loss of the shuttle Columbia in 2003 and the failure to fully eliminate the foam-shedding problem that caused that accident, despite three years of trying. In recent weeks, NASA decided to go ahead with the launch anyway so as to get started on the remaining 16 flights needed to complete the international space station before the aging shuttles are retired for good in 2010. . . . 
“By far the most important work on this flight involves ensuring the survival of the crew. Should any damage be found that would prevent returning to Earth, the astronauts would be transferred to the crowded space station to await rescue by another shuttle or by Russian space vehicles. The astronauts might conceivably try to repair the damage in orbit, although that seems less likely given the rudimentary capacity for such repairs.
“Their scheduled activities include testing the stability of the long extension boom as a platform for shuttle repairs and, if there is time, testing methods to repair damaged shield segments in space. The astronauts are clearly only learning how to repair a damaged shuttle and may not be ready to do it in a crisis.
“The fate of the shuttle program may depend on whether Discovery returns to Earth safely. Michael Griffin, the NASA administrator, has said he would try to shut the program down if another vehicle is lost. That would end all hope of completing the space station and of sending up a final mission to extend the life of the Hubble Space Telescope, NASA’s most productive scientific instrument.”

Bob

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