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Large Hadron Collider
Posted: 15 November 2010 03:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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And to think this is how it started:
http://www.aip.org/history/lawrence/larger-image-page/epa-20.htm

In January 1931 Lawrence and Livingston met their first success. A device about 4.5 inches in diameter used a potential of 1,800 volts to accelerate hydrogen ions up to energies of 80,000 electron volts. Lawrence immediately started planning for a bigger machine. In summer 1931 an eleven-inch cyclotron achieved a million volts.


Yo, DM, should you see this and are bored maybe you could post that image, I still haven’t figured out how to tease the image url out of these things   long face

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Posted: 15 November 2010 03:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Ask and ye shall BEHOLD!

epa-20.jpg

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Posted: 15 November 2010 10:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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From this (4.5 inches):
epa-20.jpg
To this:
lhc11.jpg
In eighty years.  We sure are smart critters.  To bad we lost out on the wisdom gene though.


For a whole bunch more awesome images of the “instrument” go to
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2008/08/the_large_hadron_collider.html

Thanks for the tip DM, though right click don’t work on this MacBook - however you did inspire me to find “page source” and work it out from there.

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Posted: 16 November 2010 01:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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citizenschallenge.pm - 15 November 2010 10:08 PM

From this (4.5 inches):

To this:

In eighty years.  We sure are smart critters.  To bad we lost out on the wisdom gene though.

For a whole bunch more awesome images of the “instrument” go to
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2008/08/the_large_hadron_collider.html

Thanks for the tip DM, though right click don’t work on this MacBook - however you did inspire me to find “page source” and work it out from there.

Sorry CC, the second picture is just one of the 4 detectors. The accelerator is even muuuuucccchhh bigger…

GdB

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Posted: 16 November 2010 10:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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GdB - 16 November 2010 01:45 AM

Sorry CC, the second picture is just one of the 4 detectors. The accelerator is even muuuuucccchhh bigger…
GdB

picky picky picky, I couldn’t fit it all into one image   tongue wink
lhc27.jpg

For a whole bunch more awesome images of the “instrument” go to
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2008/08/the_large_hadron_collider.html

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Posted: 17 November 2010 01:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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citizenschallenge.pm - 16 November 2010 10:39 PM
GdB - 16 November 2010 01:45 AM

Sorry CC, the second picture is just one of the 4 detectors. The accelerator is even muuuuucccchhh bigger…
GdB

picky picky picky, I couldn’t fit it all into one image   tongue wink

For a whole bunch more awesome images of the “instrument” go to
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2008/08/the_large_hadron_collider.html

Isn’t it great? I want to go there one day, they have guided tours. It’s only about 3 hours train trip from my home…

GdB

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Posted: 01 January 2011 08:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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There’s a fun interview at NPR’s Science Friday on the LHC

Amir Aczel Looks At The LHC

December 31, 2010

In his new book, Present at the Creation, Amir D. Aczel tells the story of the European Organization for Nuclear Research’s Large Hadron Collider. With the multibillion-euro collider, researchers hope to recreate the conditions that existed just after the Big Bang.

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Posted: 01 January 2011 08:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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so when they will start this game ? am waiting for some fireworks tongue laugh

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Posted: 01 January 2011 09:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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GdB - 17 November 2010 01:00 AM

Isn’t it great? I want to go there one day, they have guided tours. It’s only about 3 hours train trip from my home…

GdB

If you do go, please bring back a report…and pictures! smile

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Posted: 02 January 2011 06:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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NPR (national public radio) is on a roll.  This evening they followed up yesterday’s story with another cool LHC story:
higgs-result_wide.jpg?t=1293570813&s=4
Oh yea, it’s radio, but wait… turning data into sound…
Particle Pings: Sounds Of The Large Hadron Collider
by Andrew Prince

http://www.npr.org/2011/01/02/132415764/particle-pings-sounds-of-the-large-hadron-collider

“. . .  But first, researchers must overcome two very mundane hurdles: how to handle all of the data the LHC generates, and how to get non-scientists to care.
One physicist has a novel way to solve both problems: sound.

“I have some musician friends that I was talking to about physics, which I do a lot, if people will let me, and I was doing impersonations of particles — as you do — or maybe not,” Lily Asquith says with a laugh. She is a physicist who until recently worked with the LHC at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. . .

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Posted: 02 January 2011 07:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Is this the collision of just two particles?  If that is true, the result is truly remarkable. I counted sixty different direct energy/particle effects this single collision produced (not counting the apparent disintegratioin of the largest particles. .
It also showed that this collision must have been at an almost 45 degree angle on the target, producing an almost 90 degree deflection of the original particle. I wonder what a head-on collision might produce.
This just fascinating stuff!

[ Edited: 02 January 2011 07:06 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 02 January 2011 09:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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citizenschallenge.pm - 01 January 2011 08:12 PM

There’s a fun interview at NPR’s Science Friday on the LHC

Amir Aczel Looks At The LHC

December 31, 2010

In his new book, Present at the Creation, Amir D. Aczel tells the story of the European Organization for Nuclear Research’s Large Hadron Collider. With the multibillion-euro collider, researchers hope to recreate the conditions that existed just after the Big Bang.

I’m currently reading Aczel’s book.  A very friendly presentation of a fantastically complex machine and the ideas behind it.

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“The present age ... prefers the sign to the thing signified, the copy to the original, fancy to reality, the appearance to the essence ... for in these days illusion only is sacred, truth profane.”

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Posted: 03 January 2011 01:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Gee, I just recall that in a highschool English class we had to choose a not too famous person and write a two or three page biography of him (remember this was in the mid 1940s so the teacher didn’t say “him or her”.)  I did mine on Earnest Orlando Lawrence.  Bizarre that I still remember his first two names after about 64 years.

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Posted: 03 January 2011 06:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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Write4U - 02 January 2011 07:01 PM

Is this the collision of just two particles?  If that is true, the result is truly remarkable. I counted sixty different direct energy/particle effects this single collision produced (not counting the apparent disintegratioin of the largest particles. .
It also showed that this collision must have been at an almost 45 degree angle on the target, producing an almost 90 degree deflection of the original particle. I wonder what a head-on collision might produce.
This just fascinating stuff!

Probably not, each packet of protons has 100 BILLION protons in it and there are 2808 packets in each beam.  Each collision has billions of potential collisions in each detector.

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“The present age ... prefers the sign to the thing signified, the copy to the original, fancy to reality, the appearance to the essence ... for in these days illusion only is sacred, truth profane.”

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