Skin Cancer Foundation Seal
Posted: 14 July 2006 05:52 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I just learned about this seal for "recommendation" of sun
protection, so I thought that this post might help some of
you, my friends.  The Skin Cancer Foundation says that,
"Sunscreen products that have been awarded the Seal of
Recommendation have met stringent criteria for safety
and effectiveness."  I thought you might like to know.

The seal is better than nothing, because not we can
examine if the Skin Cancer Foundation is really on our
side by recommend products that we can buy [u:fdca83521c]and[/u:fdca83521c]
that lower our risk of cancer.  grin

http://www.skincancer.org/aboutus/seal.php

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Posted: 14 July 2006 05:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Skin Cancer Foundation Seal

I just learned about this seal for “recommendation” of sun
protection, so I thought that this post might help some of
you, my friends.  The Skin Cancer Foundation says that,
“Sunscreen products that have been awarded the Seal of
Recommendation have met stringent criteria for safety
and effectiveness.”  I thought you might like to know.

The seal is better than nothing, because not we can
examine if the Skin Cancer Foundation is really on our
side by recommend products that we can buy and
that lower our risk of cancer.  grin

http://www.skincancer.org/aboutus/seal.php

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I saw a happy rainbow recently.

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Posted: 18 July 2006 11:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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maybe if i ever happen to buy sunscreeen, i will use your advice.  One of the perks of being a native american is that you don’t usually get sunburned.

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Posted: 20 July 2006 04:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I saw a lecture by a expert on melanoma cancer a couple
weeks ago.  He said many things to teach the audience about
melanoma.  Among them he said that while it is true that
people of Caucasian decent are more likely to be diagnosed
with melanoma, the bad news is that people of African
decent are more likely to get a melanoma that is more
dangerous and aggressive.  The people of African decent are
most likely to get it on the palms of there hands and feet.
Since melanoma is so difficult to diagnosis and changes
so unpredictable, the only rule-of-thumb for looking at
growths on your skin is that if it is somewhat round and
bigger than 6mm in diameter, then it is likely cancer.
But it needs testing to have an accurate diagnosis.
The reason that people should be concerned with melanoma
cancer is that the increasing rate of melanoma diagnoses
makes it the fastest rising cancer in the USA.  And he
stated simply that SPF 15 sunscreen is effective at
reducing your risk of skin cancer.

I bought SPF 50 the last time because SPF 15 is a joke for
me, and I see nothing wrong with trying for a stronger
sunscreen.  That lecture was what got me started about
thinking about sunscreen and cancer.

[quote author=“theatheretic”]maybe if i ever happen to buy sunscreeen, i will use your advice.  One of the perks of being a native american is that you don’t usually get sunburned.

Well burns do raise your risk of having cancer:

“A person’s risk for skin cancer doubles if he or she has
had five or more sunburns.”

“One blistering sunburn in childhood more than doubles a
person?s chances of developing melanoma later in life.”

(Quoted from http://www.skincancer.org/skincancer-facts.php
.)

so lucky for you at keeping your risk lower than me,
theatheistheretic!  grin But is your risk of a sunburn 0%
based on your history?  I’ll bet it is if you limit your
sun exposure to the exposure of your past.  But is your
risk of skin cancer, due to sun exposure, 0% when you’ve
got 0% risk of sun burning?  I doubt it.  That because
since people of African decent have a risk, and the
quantity of melanin that you were born to have indicates
what your risk of cancer is, then I think that the native
American people have more risk that the African decent
people, who have more melanin than native American people.
The people of African decent have significant risk of being
diagnosed with a narrower variety, but more aggressive
version of melanoma than the people of Caucasian decent.
Although the people of African decent have less overall
risk than the people of Caucasian decent.  In other words
if your counting on 0% risk of skin cancer alone and taking
no precautions to lower your risk, then I doubt that you
are correct about being at 0% risk of skin cancer due to
sun exposure.

Many people are melanin advantaged over the most melanin
disadvantaged people (such as my half-Irish self) when
it comes to sun exposure.  But lower risk doesn’t mean no
risk, and the Mayo Clinics agree:

  “My husband, who is African-American, refuses to wear
  sunscreen when he is outdoors. He says his naturally dark
  skin protects him against sun damage. Is he correct?”

  “Answer[:] No. Everybody should wear sunscreen.”

(Quoted from
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sunscreen/AN01370 .)

And I don’t think that the melanin advantaged people
have any advantages when it comes to eye protection.
But the four-eyed people might have a bit of an advantage
if they’ve been wearing UV protective lens.  UV protective
eyewear is important, and UV protection is _necessary_ if
the eyewear is tinted.  That’s because your iris respond to
the visible light and will dilate when the light is darken
because of the tinted lenses.  That dilate lets more UV
light into your eyes raising all the risks of UV light,
which is a bad thing.  So you need 100% UV protection from
your tinted lens to avoid raising your UV light risks.

Here’s a decent article about sun glasses, if you’d like
to learn a little more:

http://science.howstuffworks.com/sunglass.htm

I wish cancer were as simple as: I’m native American and
so I’m fine.  I really do wish that for you, but I just
don’t think cancer is that simple.

And if you think that this message was scary, then you
obviously haven’t seen the photos of melanoma that I’ve
seen.  :shock: Those are scary!

Stay cool in the shade everyone.  Healthy skin looks as
dark or as light as it was meant to look when you were
born! grin

- steve s.

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