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Refiners Seek To Rename High Fructose Corn Syrup
Posted: 15 September 2010 02:02 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Yes, everyone’s most hated sweetener is looking to get a new image.  The backlash over it has apparently reached epic proportions of stupidity.

[ Edited: 15 September 2010 02:19 PM by Dead Monky ]
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Posted: 15 September 2010 02:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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HFCS ain’t got nothin’ on MSG.  So, how long until a pasty white guy capitalizes on HFCS by strictly living on the stuff for a month?

DM, I feel ya.

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Posted: 15 September 2010 02:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Remember when they ‘renamed’ prunes, dried plums??

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Posted: 15 September 2010 04:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Or horsepiss, Light American Lager?

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Posted: 15 September 2010 04:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I use MSG in a fair amount of my cooking, and would use corn syrup if called for in the recipe.  MSG does “accent” the flavor a bit and is merely the sodium salt of an amino acid our bodies make as necessary.  Fructose is just half of the sucrose molecule.  I agree that using stupid amounts of them can be a problem, but they are both naturally occurring parts of our bodies and foods.  Of course, to replace fructose and sucrose I often use aspertame, another of the fruitcake “organicists” NO NOs. 

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Posted: 15 September 2010 04:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Occam. - 15 September 2010 04:22 PM

I use MSG in a fair amount of my cooking, and would use corn syrup if called for in the recipe.  MSG does “accent” the flavor a bit and is merely the sodium salt of an amino acid our bodies make as necessary.  Fructose is just half of the sucrose molecule.  I agree that using stupid amounts of them can be a problem, but they are both naturally occurring parts of our bodies and foods.  Of course, to replace fructose and sucrose I often use aspertame, another of the fruitcake “organicists” NO NOs. 

Occam

I’m sorry, but I cannot stand the aspertame aftertaste (or any of the artificial low-calorie sweeteners I’ve tasted).  Good friends of mine say it’s an acquired taste, but no way.  Likewise, I prefer the taste of soft drinks with HFCS to the “throwback” beverages that are coming out or the Mexican versions. 

To paraphrase Aristotle, YAY moderation! Have your occasional doughnut burger, deep-fried Twinkies, or grease-pit burger at 3:00 i the morning with a pitcher of beer, but just not everyday. 

I don’t really keep up with nutrition facts, but what is the verdict on the low-calorie artificial sweeteners or other taboo food ingredients?  I just look at the calories/serving, fiber, protein, sugar, and fats part of the labels.  Oh and the taste.

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Posted: 15 September 2010 05:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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You are quite right, Chud; we all have different taste sensitivities.  I don’t get any after taste from saccharin or aspertame when used in small amounts in my coffee or cold cereal, but I detest bitterness.  That’s why I really don’t like beer or even most red wines. 

Fructose and glucose pretty much duplicate the taste of sucrose, but the first is about 1.5 times as sweet and the latter about 0.5 as sweet.  I do get a kick out of the horrors seen in the use of fructose, but that many who complain, use only “natural” sweeteners like honey (which is mostly fructose).  Oh, and as an aside, fructose is the only sugar in human semen.  LOL

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Posted: 15 September 2010 05:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Chudwick - 15 September 2010 04:41 PM

Have your occasional doughnut burger, deep-fried Twinkies, or grease-pit burger at 3:00 am

Where is that puking smilie when you need it?

Notice I cut out the pitcher of beer, you know one can survive on that horsepiss stuff.  cool smirk

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Posted: 16 September 2010 06:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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What they really should do is get rid of gvernment subsidies that encourage using way too much fructose as food sweeteners.  There’s no reason why something like Juicy Juice, which doesn’t have sugar added (it just depends on what is found in the juices naturally), should be MORE expensive than Minute Maid, which definitely does have added fructose, and additional processing as well.

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Posted: 16 September 2010 10:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Sure there’s a reason.  If they can make something from cheaper ingredients they can charge less.  However, what annoys me about most of the fruit drinks that claim 100% juice is that they still use cheap ingredients.  if I want the juice of a particular fruit, I DON’T want it to be mostly white grape juice or apple juice.

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Posted: 16 September 2010 10:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Occam. - 16 September 2010 10:06 AM

Sure there’s a reason.  If they can make something from cheaper ingredients they can charge less.  However, what annoys me about most of the fruit drinks that claim 100% juice is that they still use cheap ingredients.  if I want the juice of a particular fruit, I DON’T want it to be mostly white grape juice or apple juice.

Occam

Is this why no orange juice one buys at a store ever tastes like the freshly squeezed one? OTOH, I buy freshly squeezed orange juice on the weekends and I’ve noticed that after a few days it starts to taste like the “non-freshly squeezed” orange juice. Why is this?

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Posted: 16 September 2010 10:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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George - 16 September 2010 10:19 AM
Occam. - 16 September 2010 10:06 AM

Sure there’s a reason.  If they can make something from cheaper ingredients they can charge less.  However, what annoys me about most of the fruit drinks that claim 100% juice is that they still use cheap ingredients.  if I want the juice of a particular fruit, I DON’T want it to be mostly white grape juice or apple juice.

Occam

Is this why no orange juice one buys at a store ever tastes like the freshly squeezed one? OTOH, I buy freshly squeezed orange juice on the weekends and I’ve noticed that after a few days it starts to taste like the “non-freshly squeezed” orange juice. Why is this?

The answer lies right in your statement George. It’s no longer freshly squeezed. I’m sure Occam can explain the way these things breakdown. It’s probably oxidation and just plain aging.
I’m sure when the oranges are freshly squeezed all kinds of aromatics are released. This gives it the best taste. I don’t think those aromatics last very long though.

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Posted: 16 September 2010 12:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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George - 16 September 2010 10:19 AM
Occam. - 16 September 2010 10:06 AM

Sure there’s a reason.  If they can make something from cheaper ingredients they can charge less.  However, what annoys me about most of the fruit drinks that claim 100% juice is that they still use cheap ingredients.  if I want the juice of a particular fruit, I DON’T want it to be mostly white grape juice or apple juice.

Occam

Is this why no orange juice one buys at a store ever tastes like the freshly squeezed one? OTOH, I buy freshly squeezed orange juice on the weekends and I’ve noticed that after a few days it starts to taste like the “non-freshly squeezed” orange juice. Why is this?

Dunno, I think the Tropicana stuff I get regularly is pretty darn close ... there are other ones in glass bottles (I forget the name) that are close as well.

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Posted: 16 September 2010 12:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Yes, Tropicana is close—I think it even says that the only ingredient is oranges, IIRC—but still not the same as the fresh one.

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Posted: 16 September 2010 12:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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I just called my friend who is a chemist and makes artificial flavours, but he is away for a couple of weeks. I’ll ask him about the juice when he comes back. I once visited his lab and let me tell you that optical illusions are nothing compared to “taste” illusions. I remember him showing me a powder of some rare plant from the jungle that smelled like mash potatoes; needless to say, he uses it to prepare a flavour that is being added to fast foods’ mash potatoes to make them taste “more real.” The cost of that raw plant powder was thousands of dollars for a little container. Amazing!

I also remember asking him why Häagen-Dazs ice cream was so expensive and he told me that customers expect the same taste each time they buy the product. If the taste differs, the brain gets suspicious. There are two ways of achieving a steady taste, artificially (that’s what my friend does) and naturally (that’s the expensive way). The reason why Häagen-Dazs is expensive is because they select each fruit to assure the continuously desirable taste. Cool stuff!

[ Edited: 16 September 2010 12:47 PM by George ]
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Posted: 16 September 2010 03:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Vyazma was right, George.  Some of the flavor factors are very susceptible to oxidation and taste change.  Another, is that there are enzymes in the juice that cause the materials to break down, also changing the flavor to a bit more stale.  If the manufacturer is very careful to avoid exposure to the oxygen in the air, and to do the minimum of pasturization (necessary to keep the bacteria at bay) the flavor change will be minimized.  I have no idea if it would work, but you might want to try using distilled water, boiling it first to get rid of the dissolved oxygen, add the frozen orange juice concentrate, mix while avoiding any air from dissolving into it and storing it in the refirgerator in a container that you can completely fill and cover.

Yes, there are materials that give something its flavor or enhance flavors (MSG does that for meat type products).  I had my company buy a number of materials that would sublime at moderate temperatures in hopes of finding some that would absorb enough heat as they ablated that they would protect the surface below them.  One was maltol.  This is a chemical found in sprouting barley in microscopic amounts.  It tends to enhance many sweet flavors (great in a mediocre wine), and it’s needed in only a few parts per million.  However, it costs humdreds or thousands of dollars per kilogram.  I didn’t work as an ablative, and I was furious that a lab chemist pitched out the remaining three pounds of material.  I brought home the remaining 100 grams that were going to be discarded, and I use it sparingly.
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