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Do you like to eat and cook?
Posted: 13 January 2011 06:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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I’d so try chocolate covered bacon!  LOL

citizenschallenge.pm - 12 January 2011 02:07 PM

I’ll stick with the likes of

jump_in_the_pit - 10 January 2011 01:13 AM

So, eat the good food, fresh and ripe, only cook what veggies/fruits need to be (squash, potato, wax turnip, parsnip, etc.), enjoy exploring the rich variety rather than merely a few items, and the microwave is quick, easy, and safe.  Eat salads, explore the herbs and spices for flavor.  I like it.  smile

I haven’t vetted this, but I heard on a Food Network show that to get the most from spinach, it should be cooked.

Our children probably eat more raw veggies than we do and with few exceptions (peas and green beans) they won’t eat cooked veggies. I certainly could stand to eat more veggies and fruit, and less carbs and meat. But I’m a work in progress. smile

As to cucumbers… (Pickling cukes are different from the standard cukes. We prefer the English cucumbers.)

I found a simple recipe a while back for a cucumber salad that’s just (peeled and seeded) cucumber (English), canola oil, vinegar (white I think), and fresh dill. (There may be one or two more ingredients, but I don’t think so.) But then I love cucumber and dill. (Definitely in the pickled form as well. wink)

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 13 January 2011 08:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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I love fresh spinach sauted in garlic and butter with a little salt until it is wilted. It is the only way my sons will eat it too. I like dill, I have a wonderful dill recipe with pasta and shrimp, but my sons won’t eat it. They don’t like dill at all. I also have a recipe for a dill butter to use with cracked crab that is delicious, but they won’t eat that either! smile
I like fresh cucumbers, but I have to avoid it, since I’m allergic to most of that family of foods…. downer

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Posted: 14 January 2011 12:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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asanta - 13 January 2011 08:13 PM

I love fresh spinach sauted in garlic and butter with a little salt until it is wilted. It is the only way my sons will eat it too. I like dill, I have a wonderful dill recipe with pasta and shrimp, but my sons won’t eat it. They don’t like dill at all. I also have a recipe for a dill butter to use with cracked crab that is delicious, but they won’t eat that either! smile
I like fresh cucumbers, but I have to avoid it, since I’m allergic to most of that family of foods…. downer

It was only in the past two or three years that I started liking dill. I don’t know why the change… <shrug>

The shrimp pasta dish sounds quite tasty!

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 14 January 2011 03:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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While I like dill, I’ll be using fresh anise (from the field near me) in the stir fry I volunteered to make for the party of area Demo Clubs next Sunday.  Since some are vegetarians will contain asparagus, cauliflower, bell pepper (one finely chopped jalapeno), onion, jicama, carrots, garlic, ginger, sesame seeds and fried tofu along with the anise (cilantro by the side).

Occam

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Posted: 14 January 2011 04:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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I love to cook and eat but my preferred style of cooking is very much in the European classical school.
I love butter and cream and cheeses.  This leads to some conflict with the wife whose cholesterol is moderately
high while mine is genetically low (137 total and 42 HDL) so we eat more veggies than I’d like with some brown rice and other grains
as side dishes.  Meat is a biggie, grilled beef, lamb, and fried pork chops in the family style are quite popular.  You can’t live
forever, right?

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Posted: 15 January 2011 04:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Garlic? smile Ginger? smile Rosemary? smile Garlic? smile Olive Oil? smile turnip with the greens? smile Garlic? smile Gai Lan (Chinese broccoli)? smile mustard greens? smile  wax turnip (rutabaga)? smile  Garlic? smile  vidalia onion? smile shallot? smile  Garlic? smile  butternut squash? smile  butter cup squash? smile  carrot greens? smile  Garlic? smile  mint? smile  spearmint? smile  All fresh?  Yes, please!

Sure the veggies that are more moist are much more popular, but there is soooo very much good good flavor in the dryer/tougher veggies, they should be more popular.  That’s were to find happiness!  smile 

That obsession that the USA has with the two sweet/fatty and salty/fatty flavors doesn’t have to continue with good healthful nutritious delicious variety on every plate.  People never get satisfied with the salty/fatty or sweet/fatty ideas, they just eat forever never feeling satiated, like a bottomless pit.  But flavor and variety satisfies!  smile

Cinnamon? smile  Mummified olives, cucumbers, herring, red cabbage,  peperoncini, ginger, and more? smile  Lox, red onion, cream cheese (that’s salty/fatty flavored, so look out!)? smile  Jicama (he-cah-mah)? smile  Johnathan apples? smile  Navy, black-eyed pea, chick pea, roman bean, lima bean? smile  Mango? smile  Papaya? smile  Sugar snap peas? smile  Pineapple (with all the proper acid, and none of that weird stuff with no acid)? smile  Lemon (I have an addiction to those, especially when the skin gets thick, spherical, and sweet)? smile  Tobassco hot sauce? smile  Habanero hot sauce? smile  Ghost hot sauce?  I’ll have to try that one! smile

Italian?  Chinese?  Japanese?  Thai?  Irish?  Mexican?  Yes, please.  For myself, I’ll enjoy the all best ideas all over the world! smile

Has anyone ever tried real marshmallow, real cacao seeds (chocolate, without the wax and sugar), or real liquorice?  I’m curious.

FD&C Yellow #5?  Crystallized cane juice?  Xanthan Gum?  ascorbic acid?  glycerin?  An easy rule-of-thumb to avoid those “food additives” (not called food, they are called food additives) is: if it has an ingredient list of more than about three or four items, then don’t buy it.  smile

All the over-processed foods: spreads like: mustard, ketchup, hummus, peanut butter, etc; and more like whipped cream, pumpkin pie, cake icing, butter, cake, bread, etc… all the emulsions ... we’ve heard the stories about the factory standards for years, the standards that allow some of this and some of that debris into those foods, how much debris would you allow in your kitchen before discarding the food?  Those factory over-processed foods are simply dirty foods, regardless of the intended ingredients, the unintended ones are just dirty!  We just can’t trust the factories to be clean enough to handle the highly-processed foods.  :(

And corn syrup… it’s as fine a sweetener as any… but there is just way too much of it out there!  :(  Hydrogenated oil!!!  People can’t even digest that, I’ve read!  big surprise  It’s pretty scary out there in the grocery store and the restaurants, just stick with the real food to be safe.

Marshmallow

marshmallow.jpg

Fermented cacao seeds

cacao.jpg

[ Edited: 15 January 2011 05:01 PM by jump_in_the_pit ]
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Posted: 15 January 2011 07:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Two minor comments, J-I-T-P.  1.  Ascorbic acid is just the chemical name for vitamin c, which is in the lemons you enjoy.  !.  You have an impressive list of ethnic foods you enjoy, but how about Indian/Pakistani and Ehioopian?

Occam

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Posted: 15 January 2011 09:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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Occam. - 15 January 2011 07:02 PM

Two minor comments, J-I-T-P.  1.  Ascorbic acid is just the chemical name for vitamin c, which is in the lemons you enjoy.  !.  You have an impressive list of ethnic foods you enjoy, but how about Indian/Pakistani and Ehioopian?

India/Pakistan, Ethiopia… Yep, the rainbow is big and beautiful.  This thread just holds the tip of the iceburg!  Its a wonderful thing to explore!  smile

You got me Occam, I got carried away with my hedonism!  <shrug> downer  I retract.  Ascorbic acid is one of those vitamins that’s hard to overdose on, as I hear, do correct me if I’m mistaken. 

You’re not saying that the ascorbic acid additive comes from fruit, are you Occam?  You’re not saying tha synthesized vitamins are equal to the vitamins in real food are you?  I ask you sincerely.

But, make a list of a few real foods and I’ll bet that that’ll sound like more appetizing recipe than if you added ascorbic acid in addition! grin

Red garnet potatoes, roasted tender, sweet as pie, hot as fire, cinnamon on top.  Sockeye salmon steak, grilled till the meat slides apart, glowing deep pink, coated in cracked dried pepper corns and fresh rosemary.  Steamed rutabaga, with red wine vinegar, light olive oil, and clover honey drizzled around.  Appetizing, no?

Now we’ll add some ascorbic acid to preserve it, we won’t serve it to you fresh today, but the acid will help preserve it for a few days in storage and then we’ll serve it to you.  Now, is that ascorbic acid enhancing your appetite?  Occam the chemist says ascorbic acid means Vitamin C, but I hungry-man jump_in_the_pit say it more practically means longer storage!  I think that people’s appetite can guide them well if they could learn to listen to it, over the other unhealthful noises. smile  You don’t want anyone else storing your food before giving it to you, do you people?  Don’t you people agree? 

Food is better than food additives.  The beef is all dyed red people, so that they can store it longer and still look red!  The farmed salmon is dyed too, so that the farmers can feed the salmon a different diet, and the salmon still looks pink inside instead of white.  They put yellows in a red mesh bag so that they look like oranges!

[ Edited: 16 January 2011 09:47 AM by jump_in_the_pit ]
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Posted: 15 January 2011 11:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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‘Synthetic’ vitamin is used by your body in exactly the same way as ‘natural’ vitamins. Your body can’t tell the difference. The only difference between the two, is that the synthetic may not be complete. If you eat the variety of foods you listed, you do not need vitamins. Vitamins are a rip-off, a manufactured need in healthy people. I have eaten most of those foods you have listed. I have a wonderful food store two blocks away, that stocks foods from all over the world. I have also eaten ‘natural’ marshmallows, and licorice. They do taste a little different, but they are both very good. My sons were surprised to learn, as children, that there really is a marsh mallow! Beef is not dyed, they are gassed to get the red color. I don’t remember what gasses they use, but it does not affect the taste. Farmed Salmon is dyed though via their food, I’d bet they use the same sort of feed that turns flamingos pink.

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Posted: 16 January 2011 09:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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The wild fish gives us healthful fats, but is over-fished and the fat is poisoned with methyl-mercury.  The farmed fish gives us healthful fats, but is poisoned with PCBs and is fed an abnormal diet.

It just seems like the more I learn about food, the more difficult it is to make a good choice.  I just think that some simple rules-of-thumb are never perfect, but helpful.  And small ingredient lists normally mean better food, as a rule-of-thumb.  smile

Once I wondered what was happening with all the foods in the supermarket.  I wondered what the ingredient list could tell me.  So one day I decided to read the ingredient lists… all of them.

A few hours later I found what I was looking for, I found the patterns, I stopped reading, I was suddenly able to predict the first five to eight ingredients listed by just looking at the front label.  smile  The patterns that I found, were all for bad motives.  Motives like visual and flavor deceptions, and an increased shelf-life, or to replace lost nutrition, or to add nutrition that was never ripe and ready.  downer  I’m glad the gov’t requires ingredient lists now-a-days, but I just see them as a badge of shame now-a-days.  There are exceptions, of course, and generally the-shorter-the-better.

There is so much corn syrup out there people!  You don’t really love corn syrup that much, do you?  They add corn syrup to almost every food with an ingredient list, except the ones with the smallest ingredient lists. 

                          Confused but hungry.

[ Edited: 16 January 2011 09:54 AM by jump_in_the_pit ]
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Posted: 16 January 2011 07:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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Yeah, the ascorbic acid extracted from lemons and made synthetically are identical.  There is no test that can identify which is which.  And yes, one can take too much vitamin c.  Linus Pauling recommended 12 grams a day. I was taking 8 grams a day.  When I got a kidney stone my urologist chewed me out because some people convert the excess to oxalic acid which crystallizes out with calcium in the kidneys. 

The gas used to keep meat red is carbon monoxide.  Not dangerous, but only for cosmetics. 

I also read all of the ingredients, but I don’t get upset with as many of them as you do JITP.  After all, as a chemist, my favorite saying is the old DuPont one, “Better Living Through Chemistry”.  LOL

A few of the products with ingredients that I always put back are ‘partially hydrogenated vegetable oil” (known as transfats), coconut oil, and palm oil. 

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Posted: 16 January 2011 08:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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Although wheat grains are very nutritious, my favorite grain is oats.  I love the flavor.  And if one can get the steel cut, that is nice because it feels heartier than the rolled oats, and that is pleasant and satisfying.  smile

1) When the beef industry knows that we use color to judge the freshness of the meat, they delay that oxidation process with CO, that is just deceptive, I can’t imagine any other believable purpose, not for beauty.  2) When they pulverize and powder highly nutritious grains, destroying most of the nutrition in them, then adding synthesized vitamins, and then calling that “enrichment”... that is just a deception and an inadaquate practice giving less synthesized nutrition than what the grain should have.  3) When they choose the tougher blander varieties, rather than the heirloom varieties of produce, for the sake of shipping the food longer distances without visible damage,  after traveling from the farm the food stops at the central factory for brand labeling before traveling to supermarket, this is done to empower the factory owner with centralized control.  The lack of damage from a long trip is a deception.  These aren’t emotional conclusions, they are factual ones.

Synthesized chemistry is no substitute for color, freshness, nor nutrition in food.  Fresh, ripe, colorful, flavorful, and nutritious is the correct goal when food shopping., no matter how elusive that goal has become.  smile  Can’t everyone agree to that goal?

[ Edited: 16 January 2011 08:39 PM by jump_in_the_pit ]
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Posted: 16 January 2011 08:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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Enriching grain and milk was actually a big step in defeating nutritional deficiencies of earlier times when nutrition was very poor in impoverished populations of our country. In some parts of the country it is still important. The decision to fortify milk and bread was not taken lightly, and was done after much discussion of what would be the best foods to get bang for your buck. One of my grandfathers died of a nutritional deficiency(pre-enrichment) , something unheard of today.

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Posted: 17 January 2011 10:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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Look I’m certainly not a nutritionist, but I have read some about it.  I think that one of the biggest problems with nutrition now-a-days is that people don’t know, anymore, good food when they see it!  So let me give you an example of the difference that I’m getting at between food-with-synthesized-chemicals and food.  Let’s plan a meal, how ‘bout some breakfast.

Food with synthesized chemicals:

  skim milk, Total with raisins (Whole Grain Wheat, Rasins, Sugar, Corn Bran, Corn Syrup, Brown Sugar Syrup, Salt, Trisodium Phosphate.  Annatto Extract Color, BHT Added to Preserve Freshness.

  (Vitamins and Minerals: Calcium Carbonate, Zinc and Iron (mineral nutrients), Vitamin E Acetate, A B Vitamin (niacinamide), Vitamin C (sodium ascorbate), A B Vitamin (calcium pantothenate), Vitamin B_6 (pyridoxine hydrochloride), Vitamin B_2 (riboflavin), Vitamin B_1 (thiamin mononitrate), A B Vitamin (folic acid) Vitamin A (palmitate), Vitamin B_12, Vitamin D_3.)

[That’s from GM Total cereals]

Food:

  skim milk, dried whole wheat, rasins, water.


Do you see my point that smaller ingredient lists are generally better? Doesn’t the food sound like the more appetizing and nutritious choice?  Dosen’t all the synthesized chemistry seem unappetizing?  smile

Asanta, I’m very sad to hear how your grandfather passed.  I am sympathetic to the causes of the poor and instead of serving people with a synthesized meal, I want to serve them food!  I’m sure they’d agree.  grin  No-one really likes the cheap discount products, they are low quality and just don’t serve their intended purpose, they just fall apart.  downer  One of the big complaints of today’s poor is that they can’t find real food in their neighborhoods, only junk food.

The grains are highly nutritious, especially wheat, and the vitamin “enrichment” is not an appropriate word.  When the original nutrition of the grain is lost, synthesized vitamins added… that is a repair, a patch, it is like a bandage, it is not an enriched meal.  You enrich a meal with real grains, fruits, veggies, beans, seeds, lean meats and dairy, and nuts.  smile  The real food is a better value, dollar for dollar.  Asanta, I wonder what were the debating points of the meetings that you’re referring to, I wonder if they debated the choice between either synthesized chemistry or real food?

Now-a-days nutrition research is finding many valuable isoflavanoids in the fruits and other foods.  Factories don’t even synthesize these, and who knows what more nutrition will be found in the future?  Real food is far more valuable than synthesized.  People have lost sight of that basic goal, they have been destracted from it by the synthesized chemical products.

For those who’ve never experienced all the various grains in their normal whole form, eating dried grains is like eating dried rice or dried beans, you soak it, boil it, and then serve a hot pile of it on you plate.  smile

BRM-bd7cbacc0d69d515986624c9f9e5360a.jpg

And I have no arguments against pasteurized Vitamin D enriched milk.  Milk normally doesn’t have D and it’s a catalyst for Calcium I hear, so I’m willing to call that an enrichment.  The synthesized chemistry does have some value, but it is far inferior and so no substitute real food.

[ Edited: 17 January 2011 11:20 AM by jump_in_the_pit ]
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Posted: 17 January 2011 02:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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If any of you aren’t familiar with Michael Pollan you’re missing out:

http://michaelpollan.com/books/the-omnivores-dilemma/
The Omnivores Dilemma

In this groundbreaking book, one of America’s most fascinating, original, and elegant writers turns his own omnivorous mind to the seemingly straightforward question of what we should have for dinner.
To find out, Pollan follows each of the food chains that sustain us—industrial food, organic or alternative food, and food we forage ourselves—from the source to a final meal, and in the process develops a definitive account of the American way of eating. His absorbing narrative takes us from Iowa cornfields to food-science laboratories, from feedlots and fast-food restaurants to organic farms and hunting grounds, always emphasizing our dynamic coevolutionary relationship with the handful of plant and animal species we depend on.
Each time Pollan sits down to a meal, he deploys his unique blend of personal and investigative journalism to trace the origins of everything consumed, revealing what we unwittingly ingest and explaining how our taste for particular foods and flavors reflects our evolutionary inheritance.

And Pollan is a very good writer so it is almost a spellbinding read.
His other books are pretty good too.

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