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Do you like to eat and cook?
Posted: 17 January 2011 03:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 46 ]
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I’ve read all of Pollan’s books. I typically don’t eat a lot of processes food either, I like to cook fresh foods, and in some cases frozen veggies, which can be more nutritious than the fresh, because they were frozen at their prime, although I do agree that fresh veggies taste better.

JITP, fortifying bread was a way to save thousands of lives, and it did. It was not a matter of getting more nutritious food, for families like mine, it was a matter of getting food. Most very poor families have access to bread or grain, which is very cheap and filling. Thus the decision to fortify the wheat and bread. My family owned a farm for about 150 years. When times were rough and you couldn’t grow enough food (this was during the depression), people starved or made the food choices they could make to stay alive. My mom, until the day she died, wouldn’t allow us to eat fried corn pone, because she was convinced it caused some nutritional disorder (I can’t remember which, it has been years since she died), and I could never convince her otherwise.

The vitamin D was to prevent rickets, a disease which is on the rise again, because kids stay indoors more, and uses sunscreen to protect against the sun. The CO2 is cosmetic only, and is there because of consumer demand. Consumers will not purchase beef that is not red, they think that is the color it must be to be fresh. Most of them did not grow up on farms to see what meat truly looks like.

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Posted: 17 January 2011 05:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 47 ]
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asanta - 17 January 2011 03:45 PM

The vitamin D was to prevent rickets, a disease which is on the rise again, because kids stay indoors more, and uses sunscreen to protect against the sun. The CO2 is cosmetic only, and is there because of consumer demand. Consumers will not purchase beef that is not red, they think that is the color it must be to be fresh. Most of them did not grow up on farms to see what meat truly looks like.

I had no idea the red was “fake”. smile So what does it really look like then?

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 17 January 2011 06:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 48 ]
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Thank you asanta and Occam for the historical and chemical information.  I’ll have to read more.  Obviously I’ve upset you two.  smile

Pollan, yeah he’s doing good reporting I hear.  I’d like to read his work.

Frozen fruit is a good party favor, use it instead of ice for the drinks!  Nutritious and festive.  smile

[ Edited: 17 January 2011 07:21 PM by jump_in_the_pit ]
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Posted: 17 January 2011 07:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 49 ]
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If you watch crime dramas, you may see the medical examiner comment that the victim who supposedly killed himself by sitting in his running car in his garage and gassed himself with carbon monoxide, “This guy was killed elsewhere.  See how his skin is pale.  Carbon monoxide reacts with hemoglobin to make a deep red color.”  Oxygenated blood is bright red, but as the oxygen is quickly used up the hemoglobin turns a muddy dark brownish red.  When butchers had the meat open in the case, the surface absorbed more oxygen keeping the meat red.  Now that it’s wrapped in a sheet of plastic, it turns brown in only a few minutes so it looks stale in the case.  That’s why they expose the meat to carbon monoxide.

Nah, JITP, you didn’t upset me; Everyone has the right to eat what ever s/he wants to.  However, I hate to see someone making decisions because they’ve been given incorrect information.  I was just trying to correct that, not change your food habits.  smile

Oh, I mentioned that I was going to make stirfried vegetables for a multi-club Democratic meeting Sunday.  I decided to go with Pakistani spicing, and to cook twice as much as was needed so I could take some home for a few meals of my own.  Unfortunately, the damned people finished it all off.  snake

Occam

[ Edited: 17 January 2011 07:39 PM by Occam. ]
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Posted: 17 January 2011 07:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 50 ]
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jump_in_the_pit - 17 January 2011 06:55 PM

Thank you asanta and Occam for the historical and chemical information.  I’ll have to read more.  Obviously I’ve upset you two.  smile

Pollan, yeah he’s doing good reporting I hear.  I’d like to read his work.

Frozen fruit is a good party favor, use it instead of ice for the drinks!  Nutritious and festive.  smile

I’m not upset, just correcting misconceptions. Frozen fruit is great to add to smoothies!

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Posted: 18 January 2011 09:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 51 ]
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I like radicchio, it has gorgeous white and burgundy colors, I enjoy the flavor when it is paired well.  I pair it in a salad with a sweet ingredient like dried fruit, balsamic vinegar, etc.  Radicchio enhances the other flavors, it makes the sweet taste sweeter!  I guess that it has a hysteresis effect on the taste buds. I love it!  cool smile

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Posted: 18 January 2011 11:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 52 ]
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Occam. - 17 January 2011 07:36 PM

If you watch crime dramas, you may see the medical examiner comment that the victim who supposedly killed himself by sitting in his running car in his garage and gassed himself with carbon monoxide, “This guy was killed elsewhere.  See how his skin is pale.  Carbon monoxide reacts with hemoglobin to make a deep red color.”  Oxygenated blood is bright red, but as the oxygen is quickly used up the hemoglobin turns a muddy dark brownish red.  When butchers had the meat open in the case, the surface absorbed more oxygen keeping the meat red.  Now that it’s wrapped in a sheet of plastic, it turns brown in only a few minutes so it looks stale in the case.  That’s why they expose the meat to carbon monoxide.

Cool… Thanks for info!

Occam. - 17 January 2011 07:36 PM

Oh, I mentioned that I was going to make stirfried vegetables for a multi-club Democratic meeting Sunday.  I decided to go with Pakistani spicing, and to cook twice as much as was needed so I could take some home for a few meals of my own.  Unfortunately, the damned people finished it all off.  snake

Occam

LOL (Maybe make is spicier next time? wink

Have you folks seen these cool “portable” outdoor woks?

http://www.amazon.com/18-Carbon-Steel-Wok-Kit/dp/B000NCVD6U/ref=wl_it_dp_o?ie=UTF8&coliid=I2E5418OBNXMVV&colid=IIJYXE5BPKUB

(Like my wife will let me get anymore outdoor cooking gadgets! LOL

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 18 January 2011 09:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 53 ]
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Jump-in-the-pit, have you ever tried grains such as farro, quinoa (red or white), couscous, or different rices? I have black Chinese ‘forbidden rice’, red rice, green rice, and of course brown rices. They are all delicious. I don’t like basmati rice though. I don’t like oatmeal, except in cookies, probably because I was forced to eat so much oatmeal as a child because of allergies.

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Posted: 18 January 2011 09:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 54 ]
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I’ve never been very interested in rice, but you are peaking my interest asanta.  I’ve enjoyed the basmati (Texmati actually), and wild rice is fun.  Be careful of the wild rice, the big brands actually fill the box with white rice and just give you a few grains of the black wild rice.  The variety is called “wild” but that doesn’t mean that they hunt-and-gather it, they do cultivate the variety.  It has more “tooth” as they say, and a bit of an herbal flavor.  I love the hearty nutty brown rice, of course.  The sticky rice used with Sushi is kinda fun too.

I’ve had some odd Japanese ice cream, green tea and sweet bean.  I was so surprised, they both taste great, and the sweet bean ice cream is very sweet.

From the Puerto Ricans I’ve had some forbidden food, they have a blood sausage that when cooked turns black.  It tastes similar to ordinary sausage, not that I’m fond of sausage now-a-days.

I love Italian parsley, it has a great herbal flavor, you’ve got to try it in a salad.  smile

Couscous is just wheat pasta, that’s not really a different grain, though many people think that it is rice.  I’ve only read the ingredients, I haven’t bothered with it.

[ Edited: 18 January 2011 09:45 PM by jump_in_the_pit ]
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Posted: 18 January 2011 10:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 55 ]
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Green tea ice cream is my favorite after double rainbow chocolate! Black Forbidden rice is an actual short grain nutty rice,not a ‘wild’ rice, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_rice. Red and green rice are actual varieties of rice too. The gourmet store down the street from my home carries about 10-15 rice varieties. They also carry ‘unusual’ varieties of veggies, like broccolini and red and white carrots, and rapini.

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Posted: 19 January 2011 12:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 56 ]
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I do want to try your rice ideas asanta.  I will look for red, green, black Chinese ‘forbidden rice’, they sound like good ideas. 

Broccolini I’ve eaten by accident, a family member bought it.  It just seems like young ordinary broccoli to me, it tastes a bit lighter and sweeter than ordinary adult broccoli to me, but seems like the same variety. 

The Chinese broccoli (I had to look it up, Gai Lan] tastes best to me… with a sweeter, lighter, more well rounded, more succulent flavor profile, and a great texture that pops, after steaming!  That’s part of the reason why the Chinese take-out shops taste so good, even if you order it healthfully steamed. smile  I assume that those Chinese take-out shops are the same nationally because I’ve seen them so wide-spread in my travels.  So you probably do, or maybe you on the West coast don’t, know what I mean by a Chinese take-out shop.  They get a bad rap for the meat, MSG, and so much oil, but their veggies deserve more credit. 

All the varieties that I suggested in this thread are my favorites, over the ordinary highly commercialized varieties.  smile  Do try.

Are you involved in genetics asanta?  I have a language question.

It’s about the evolutionary bush, about the very tips of the branches and the crotches right before them.  Genetically speaking, what can I call the different “categories” of food, and the different “varieties” within them?  There are the popular food categories of rice, broccoli, apples, nuts, grains, etc. and underneath each of those are interesting varieties of rice (white/brown, wild, forbidden black, red, green), varieties under each category.  Those food categories are not so distantly related to be different phylum, they are different species, right?  What about the varieties, are they sub-species?  I’m asking a language question, and so I am having trouble putting it into words. 

Maybe you’re focus is on the human branch of genetics, and this being a question about various food branches then maybe I’m asking the wrong person.

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Posted: 19 January 2011 12:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 57 ]
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jump_in_the_pit - 19 January 2011 12:03 PM

It’s about the evolutionary bush, about the very tips of the branches and the crotches right before them.  Genetically speaking, what can I call the different “categories” of food, and the different “varieties” within them?  There are the popular food categories of rice, broccoli, apples, nuts, grains, etc. and underneath each of those are interesting varieties of rice (white/brown, wild, forbidden black, red, green), varieties under each category.  Those food categories are not so distantly related to be different phylum, they are different species, right?  What about the varieties, are they sub-species?  I’m asking a language question, and so I am having trouble putting it into words.

JITP, you might want to check out THIS book, The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan. I haven’t yet read it, but I was told it’s good.

[ Edited: 19 January 2011 12:21 PM by George ]
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Posted: 19 January 2011 12:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 58 ]
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Pollan is just a journalist!  He’s no botanist, geneticist, biologist, evolutionary biologist, or anything scientific.  I hear he’s doing good journalism, but I’d be surprised to find any specific information from him.  I am curious about his books, they are on my wish list.

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Posted: 19 January 2011 12:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 59 ]
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jump_in_the_pit - 19 January 2011 12:37 PM

Pollan is just a journalist!  He’s no botanist, geneticist, biologist, evolutionary biologist, or anything scientific.  I hear he’s doing good journalism, but I’d be surprised to find any specific information from him.  I am curious about his books, they are on my wish list.

question

I must say, JINT, this post is as strange as your nickname or your avatar. Why are Pollan’s books on your wish list since he’s “only” a journalist?

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Posted: 19 January 2011 01:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 60 ]
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George - 19 January 2011 12:53 PM

I must say, JINT, this post is as strange as your nickname or your avatar.

Journalists know how to research, but I prioritized Richard Dawkin’s _Ancestor’s_Tale_, a better source for genetic information, know what I mean?

Strange avatar?  An good action shot of a bird in flight, a photo of my own.  A photo from a foggy day, taken with a slow camera, that turned out fuzzy and made the birds look distant.  It needed to be touched up, so I drew nifty sky and electrical colors, and a guilded frame, in order to salvage it!  You don’t like it?  Do you expect something particular in an avatar?

Strange nickname… alright, you got me there.  smile

[ Edited: 19 January 2011 01:36 PM by jump_in_the_pit ]
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