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NET NEUTRALITY in trouble again.
Posted: 01 December 2017 11:20 PM   [ Ignore ]
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It’s breathtaking the speed with which the dismantling is happening.  It’s doesn’t matter what the facts are; it doesn’t matter where the truth lies; the morality, haha, people don’t even remember what that means any more; the good of the nation certainly is of no concern to these people. 

Railroading their agenda is all they care about no matter how much damage is inflicted.  Who’s there to stop them. 
On yeah, We The People, if we wanted to.

Net neutrality fight is about to flare again
By MARGARET HARDING MCGILL 11/15/2017
https://www.politico.com/story/2017/11/15/net-neutrality-fight-is-about-to-flare-again-244912

The FCC, under Trump-appointed Chairman Ajit Pai, is readying a final order that will spell out how thoroughly it intends to roll back the 2015 net neutrality order, which requires internet service providers like Verizon and Comcast to treat all web traffic equally. The release could come as early as next week, teeing up a possible commission vote in December.

So far, Pai has said he wants to scrap the legal foundation that the FCC’s old Democratic majority adopted to tighten federal oversight of ISPs, a move he contends has deterred the industry from investing in broadband networks. But he could also opt to eliminate the FCC’s core net neutrality rules altogether — which would in theory allow ISPs to block or throttle some types of web traffic, or charge websites for “fast lanes” to consumers.

Some FCC watchers believe the commission is likely to go that route, wiping the slate clean and relying on another agency, the FTC, to police whether internet providers are acting in an anti-competitive manner.

Just a few years back Verizon banned abortion rights activists from sending text messages to its supporters. That freedom could once again be questioned. Verizon later reversed its decision, but that is the type of power these companies could have over us with the proposed changes to Title Two and Net Neutrality.

https://www.battleforthenet.com

Now, one of the most impactful things you can do to help save net neutrality before Dec. 14th is to make phone calls to Congress.

If offices get more phone calls from constituents, we can persuade them to stop the catastrophic plan to repeal net neutrality.
Please Call: 424-363-4877

We will connect you to the offices of your lawmakers.

You can use this script when talking to them—just introduce yourself, be polite, and say:

“I support ‘Title Two’ net neutrality rules and I urge you to oppose the FCC’s plan to repeal them.
Specifically, I’d like you to contact the FCC Chairman and demand he abandon his current plan.”

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Posted: 02 December 2017 11:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Do you even know what this is about?

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Posted: 20 December 2017 01:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I only know the rough outlines
and I know that the people who do understand the details have some mighty valid points to make.

Beltane, let me ask you,
What’s the point of Ajit Pai making the changes - what does it help?  Why did he do it?


Why Net Neutrality Was Repealed and How It Affects You
By KEITH COLLINS   DEC. 14, 2017
com/2017/12/14/technology/net-neutrality-rules.html

NET NEUTRALITY: 25 Things You Need To Know
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALtSd0y-HDM
YouTube - list25 - Dec 18, 2017

Join the Battle for Net Neutrality

https://www.battleforthenet.com
The FCC just voted to gut net neutrality rules, letting Internet providers like Verizon and Comcast control
what we can see and do online with new fees, throttling, and censorship.

But we can still get Congress to stop this—by passing a “Resolution of Disapproval” to overturn the FCC vote.
We can win. Write and call Congress now! (But only with your help)

These folks have quite the organized drive going.  Check out that website.  If you are interested in making calls click the link and this comes up

Calling you now!
Introduce yourself, be polite, and say: I support Title Two net neutrality and I urge you to use the Congressional Review Act to pass a “resolution of disapproval” reversing the FCC’s December vote to repeal the Open Internet Order.

Then the phone rang, and it went on from there.

They clearly explain themselves.  The connects work, technically very professional.
For all my bitching about sleepy Americans, stuff like this offers hope. 
Massive engagement of real people, focused on what might make a difference, defending what they believe in. 
The American Way!  :-)

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Posted: 20 December 2017 10:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Pai seems to think net neutrality limits internet innovation and growth. It hasn’t limited it enough in my opinion.

Net Neutrailty means ISPs cannot regulate the price and content of the internet traffic they carry, this means traffic as disparate as Youtube, Center for Inquiry, porn sites, Jewish Singles.com and Stormfront forum are all carried “equally” by your ISP. Net neutrality didnt exist before 2015 and I’m not aware of ISPs engaging in content suppression or overcharging selected content before then, so the whole point seems moot.

There is a fear of censorship by many which is misplaced because a) ISPs need to provide content to make money and b)
web browsers and social media already engage in censorship.

This is really only a big issue because Trump is president.

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Posted: 20 December 2017 10:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Beltane - 20 December 2017 10:03 PM

Net neutrality didnt exist before 2015

Nah, it was just built into the internet protocols and system !

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Posted: 20 December 2017 11:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 20 December 2017 10:50 PM
Beltane - 20 December 2017 10:03 PM

Net neutrality didnt exist before 2015

Nah, it was just built into the internet protocols and system !

You’ll have to elaborate on this.

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Posted: 21 December 2017 07:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 20 December 2017 10:50 PM
Beltane - 20 December 2017 10:03 PM

Net neutrality didnt exist before 2015

Nah, it was just built into the internet protocols and system !

This is classic libertarian/Russian hacker thinking. That regulations cause the problem. It’s about as scientific as people who used to believe that geese came from goose barnacles. The net was invented to share information. THEN it became a tool for commerce. THEN ISPs started limiting some content.

It’s like when Mr. Burns figured out how to block the sun. Beltane would say sun neutrality didn’t exist until then.

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Posted: 21 December 2017 07:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Thank you Lausten


Beltane how about you sharing?

Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 20 December 2017 01:47 PM

Beltane, let me ask you,
What’s the point of Ajit Pai making the changes - what does it help?  Why did he do it?

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Posted: 22 December 2017 03:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Lausten - 21 December 2017 07:29 AM
Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 20 December 2017 10:50 PM
Beltane - 20 December 2017 10:03 PM

Net neutrality didnt exist before 2015

Nah, it was just built into the internet protocols and system !

This is classic libertarian/Russian hacker thinking. That regulations cause the problem. It’s about as scientific as people who used to believe that geese came from goose barnacles. The net was invented to share information. THEN it became a tool for commerce. THEN ISPs started limiting some content.

It’s like when Mr. Burns figured out how to block the sun. Beltane would say sun neutrality didn’t exist until then.

I didn’t say regulations were the problem. IMO tech companies and social media should be regulated as public utilities because they’re too powerful.

And where did ISPs limit content?

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Posted: 22 December 2017 04:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 21 December 2017 07:33 AM

Thank you Lausten


Beltane how about you sharing?

Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 20 December 2017 01:47 PM

Beltane, let me ask you,
What’s the point of Ajit Pai making the changes - what does it help?  Why did he do it?

Already answered that upthread.

Again, what did you mean by net neutrality is built into internet protocol and systems? I’m asking because that doesn’t make sense and it makes you seem like you don’t know what you’re talking about, but then again, maybe its simply one of the many benign misconceptions that people have about the internet.

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Posted: 22 December 2017 04:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Beltane - 22 December 2017 03:57 PM

And where did ISPs limit content?

This took less than a second to show up when I googled: “where did ISPs limit content?”

Data cap analysis found almost 200 ISPs imposing data limits in the US
Examination of 2,500 home Internet providers finds sizable minority with caps.

JON BRODKIN - 8/7/2017, 12:07 PM
https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/08/at-least-196-internet-providers-in-the-us-have-data-caps/

A company that tracks ISPs and data caps in the US has identified 196 home Internet providers that impose monthly caps on Internet users. Not all of them are enforced, but customers of many ISPs must pay overage fees when they use too much data.

BroadbandNow, a broadband provider search site that gets referral fees from some ISPs, has more than 2,500 home Internet providers in its database. This list includes telecommunications providers that are registered to provide service under the government’s Lifeline program, which subsidizes access for poor people. BroadbandNow’s team looked through the ISPs’ websites to generate a list of those with data caps.

The data cap information was “pulled directly from ISP websites,” BroadbandNow Director of Content Jameson Zimmer told Ars. “For those that have multiple caps, we include the lowest one and an asterisk to show that they have regional variation.”

BroadbandNow, which is operated by a company called Microbrand Media, plans to keep tracking the data caps over time in order to examine trends, he said.

From 3GB to 3TB

(Then it gets interesting.)

... “Statements from Internet providers suggest that data caps are a necessary step to combat network congestion,” BroadbandNow says. “Opponents of data caps believe that the motivation for data caps has more to do with recovering declining cable revenue or creating a roadblock for streaming services like Netflix. Whichever side you believe, the outcome is the same—data caps are becoming commonplace.”

JON BRODKIN
Jon is Ars Technica’s senior IT reporter, covering the FCC and broadband, telecommunications, wireless technology, and more.

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Posted: 22 December 2017 04:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 22 December 2017 04:10 PM
Beltane - 22 December 2017 03:57 PM

And where did ISPs limit content?

This took less than a second to show up when I googled: “where did ISPs limit content?”

Data cap analysis found almost 200 ISPs imposing data limits in the US
Examination of 2,500 home Internet providers finds sizable minority with caps.

JON BRODKIN - 8/7/2017, 12:07 PM
https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/08/at-least-196-internet-providers-in-the-us-have-data-caps/

A company that tracks ISPs and data caps in the US has identified 196 home Internet providers that impose monthly caps on Internet users. Not all of them are enforced, but customers of many ISPs must pay overage fees when they use too much data.

BroadbandNow, a broadband provider search site that gets referral fees from some ISPs, has more than 2,500 home Internet providers in its database. This list includes telecommunications providers that are registered to provide service under the government’s Lifeline program, which subsidizes access for poor people. BroadbandNow’s team looked through the ISPs’ websites to generate a list of those with data caps.

The data cap information was “pulled directly from ISP websites,” BroadbandNow Director of Content Jameson Zimmer told Ars. “For those that have multiple caps, we include the lowest one and an asterisk to show that they have regional variation.”

BroadbandNow, which is operated by a company called Microbrand Media, plans to keep tracking the data caps over time in order to examine trends, he said.

From 3GB to 3TB

(Then it gets interesting.)

... “Statements from Internet providers suggest that data caps are a necessary step to combat network congestion,” BroadbandNow says. “Opponents of data caps believe that the motivation for data caps has more to do with recovering declining cable revenue or creating a roadblock for streaming services like Netflix. Whichever side you believe, the outcome is the same—data caps are becoming commonplace.”

JON BRODKIN
Jon is Ars Technica’s senior IT reporter, covering the FCC and broadband, telecommunications, wireless technology, and more.

Data caps don’t limit content, they restrict data over a particular period of time (usually a month) and the customer has to pay more after that. Limiting content means an ISP blocks an IP address from accessing another IP address for whatever reason.  Data and content are two different things.

Data caps do - for all intents and purposes - overcharge, but there are pros and cons for their existence.

The biggest clue to this misconception is data caps have been fairly common for several years, including the net neutrality period.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandwidth_cap

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Posted: 23 December 2017 08:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Beltane - 22 December 2017 04:35 PM

Data caps don’t limit content, they restrict data over a particular period of time (usually a month) and the customer has to pay more after that. Limiting content means an ISP blocks an IP address from accessing another IP address for whatever reason.  Data and content are two different things.

Data caps do - for all intents and purposes - overcharge, but there are pros and cons for their existence.

The biggest clue to this misconception is data caps have been fairly common for several years, including the net neutrality period.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandwidth_cap

Sort of like Brodkin’s article explained.
Your point is?

My point is there’s more and scarier stuff going on here than Data Caps.

Here are four ways the internet will change if Pai gets his way on net neutrality:
http://thehill.com/policy/technology/331012-what-killing-net-neutrality-means-for-the-internet

1. More free data plans

Under the changes, mobile broadband providers would be able to let consumers access certain content without using up their data plans.
... (but) ...
If net neutrality goes out the window, so will the restrictions limiting those free data plans, making it easier for customers to access some content — but content their providers favor.


2. Internet fast lanes

Without the net neutrality rules, consumer groups and smaller internet companies fear broadband providers could offer faster internet speeds to companies that pay up and slow down those don’t or can’t pony up.

Known as paid prioritization, it’s the post-net neutrality scenario that most worries the rules’ supporters. ...


3. More challenges for the little guy

Smaller internet service providers and internet startups could be in for a tough time.

Net neutrality critics say that without the neutrality rules, the playing field will favor established or dominant companies — such as Charter Communications, which acquired Time Warner Cable, or web giants like Google.

Only established companies will be able to compete in the new environment, they fear, with deep pockets to get into internet fast lanes and the money to cut deals for content to package in their data plans.

Eight hundred startups, innovators and investors sent a letter to Pai on Wednesday arguing that his proposal to roll back net neutrality could hurt their industry. ...


4. A new regulator for telecoms

Under Pai’s proposal, broadband companies like AT&T, Comcast and Verizon would no longer be regulated by the FCC.
The chairman wants to remove their designation as “common carriers,” which allowed his agency to regulate them like public utilities.

Undoing that would cede authority over broadband providers back to the FTC.

But critics argue the FTC lacks the teeth to effectively regulate telecommunications companies in the way the FCC can. ...

The internet is a common carrier - treat it as such.

The internet as we know it is about to change drastically.
A net neutrality expert on how the FCC’s vote will change the internet as we know it.

By Eric Allen Been Updated Dec 14, 2017,

https://www.vox.com/conversations/2017/12/14/16776236/net-neutrality-made-internet-awesome-fcc-vote


Net neutrality — the standard that internet service providers, or ISPs, must treat all traffic equally — was repealed Thursday in a party-line vote by the Federal Communications Commission in Washington. FCC chair Ajit Pai, flanked by two Republican allies, has a majority on the commission.

Commercial ISPs like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon will be free to block content, throttle users’ internet use, and prioritize their own services at the expense of competitors’. It’s a wide-reaching and controversial issue that some have called one of the “biggest corporate giveaways in history.”

As net neutrality proponents see it, these protections are essential to providing open and equal access to the internet. The plan by Pai, a former Verizon attorney, is a wide-ranging dismantling of not only the safeguards put in place by the Obama administration but ones that have been embedded in the World Wide Web since its invention in 1989. ...

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Posted: 23 December 2017 08:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 01 December 2017 11:20 PM

It’s breathtaking the speed with which the dismantling is happening.  It’s doesn’t matter what the facts are; it doesn’t matter where the truth lies; the morality, haha, people don’t even remember what that means any more; the good of the nation certainly is of no concern to these people. 

Railroading their agenda is all they care about no matter how much damage is inflicted.  Who’s there to stop them. 
On yeah, We The People, if we wanted to.

Net neutrality fight is about to flare again
By MARGARET HARDING MCGILL 11/15/2017
https://www.politico.com/story/2017/11/15/net-neutrality-fight-is-about-to-flare-again-244912

The FCC, under Trump-appointed Chairman Ajit Pai, is readying a final order that will spell out how thoroughly it intends to roll back the 2015 net neutrality order, which requires internet service providers like Verizon and Comcast to treat all web traffic equally. The release could come as early as next week, teeing up a possible commission vote in December.

So far, Pai has said he wants to scrap the legal foundation that the FCC’s old Democratic majority adopted to tighten federal oversight of ISPs, a move he contends has deterred the industry from investing in broadband networks. But he could also opt to eliminate the FCC’s core net neutrality rules altogether — which would in theory allow ISPs to block or throttle some types of web traffic, or charge websites for “fast lanes” to consumers.

Some FCC watchers believe the commission is likely to go that route, wiping the slate clean and relying on another agency, the FTC, to police whether internet providers are acting in an anti-competitive manner.

Just a few years back Verizon banned abortion rights activists from sending text messages to its supporters. That freedom could once again be questioned. Verizon later reversed its decision, but that is the type of power these companies could have over us with the proposed changes to Title Two and Net Neutrality.

https://www.battleforthenet.com

Now, one of the most impactful things you can do to help save net neutrality before Dec. 14th is to make phone calls to Congress.

If offices get more phone calls from constituents, we can persuade them to stop the catastrophic plan to repeal net neutrality.
Please Call: 424-363-4877

We will connect you to the offices of your lawmakers.

You can use this script when talking to them—just introduce yourself, be polite, and say:

“I support ‘Title Two’ net neutrality rules and I urge you to oppose the FCC’s plan to repeal them.
Specifically, I’d like you to contact the FCC Chairman and demand he abandon his current plan.”

 

Tney’re Republicans. What do you expect?

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Posted: 23 December 2017 11:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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LoisL - 23 December 2017 08:05 PM

They’re Republicans. What do you expect?

I think it’s more a question of, what are we gonna do?

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Posted: 24 December 2017 01:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Trump led republicans are about dismantling.

Republicans , conservatives, and empowered Christians are all seriously outside the world I live in.

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